Of the surveyed people, only 41 per cent of British women, who have children under the age of 18, felt that they can dedicate enough time to both their career and their family. (Source: Getty/Thinkstock)For years, debates around personal and professional life, and finding a balance between the two have raged on. While some people think it is possible to strike a balance and enjoy the best of both worlds, others think there is not enough done to ensure people get to experience both. Now, a recent study has thrown light on a third angle. More men than women think that it is possible to make both progress at work and enjoy family life.

According to a YouGov poll, men and women from 17 different countries were asked if they think it is possible to go up the professional ladder, while also being a great parent at home. It was found that in almost all the surveyed countries, men were more confident than women about the prospect of it. Britain, especially, was the least optimistic, the study found. Of the surveyed people, only 41 per cent of British women, who have children under the age of 18, felt that they can dedicate enough time to both their career and their family, as compared to the 51 per cent of men who said they can easily juggle both.

Many respondents said that they live in daily debts of credit card loans, personal loans, and others. One in three persons said they think it is unlikely they will be debt-free before the age of 40. (Source: Getty/Thinkstock)Not just Britain, but in Canada as well, a whopping 76 per cent of fathers said that they can “have it all”, as opposed to the 58 per cent of mothers who said the same. In Sweden, too, the gap was significant: 73 per cent men versus 57 per cent women, as was in Singapore: 69 per cent men and 54 per cent women.

The survey data was revealed after March 8, when thousands of women went on a strike in the UK, protesting continued “undervaluing of ‘women’s work’ like child-rearing and cleaning”.

It is believed that the data may highlight, after all, the ongoing struggle to bring about gender parity in terms of wage, in workplaces all around the world. Many respondents said that they live in daily debts of credit card loans, personal loans, and others. One in three persons said they think it is unlikely they will be debt-free before the age of 40.

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